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Japanese White Pine Bonsai


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A traditional Bonsai tree is the Japanese White Pine
Caring for Japanese White Pines - Pinus Parviflora and Pentaphylla - The Japanese White Pine requires careful attention to maintain its health and train it as a bonsai. When you consider the White Pine, all of your Bonsai skills must come into play. You must utilyze your cleaning techniques, growth, re-potting, soil, pruning, wiring, water, spray, feeding, etc. Additionally, you will be dealing with peat, pests, disease, and more.

This may seem challenging, but as you master your Bonsai skills, taking care of many of these areas become almost instinctive. Extensive details on what to do are not possible in the space here, but I can provide you a few helpful tips to get you started in growing Japanese White Pines as bonsai.

How to clean:  Cleaning the pine trees is easy. Use your "thumb and index finger" to pluck old or aged pine needles. These pine needles often turn yellowish during the fall. Next, prune the internal undergrowth or foliage and get rid of any decaying and/or injured sections. And don't forget to get rid of any debris or decaying elements lying on the soil. This is a process you will do from time to time. Remember the growth of the Japanese Whites is a slow process.

Pruning the Roots:  In early spring or around mid-March, is a good time to prune the roots. Cut back the roots around 1/3 length and get rid of the aged or unhealthy roots. You can leave old soil about the roots as this will make it easier for the plant to re-establish its growth. Avoid cleaning at this stage. After you re-pot the plant, you want to, carefully watch its growth.

Adding Soil:  Adding the right soil is important when growing Japanese White Pines. Start with fertile workable soil that consists of a mixture of clay, sand, silt, and some organic matterial. Add some course sand, around 1/3 of the total soil added.
Japanese Red Pine Bonsai Tree  (pinus resinosa 'quinobequin')

Japanese Red Pine Bonsai Tree (pinus resinosa 'quinobequin')

A globe shaped dwarf with needles half as long as those of the species. Has soft flexible needles and purple-red cones. Soft reddish bark. Originated from a witches'-broom which is a dense abnormal growth that arises from mutated buds on coniferous trees. Hardy. Keep outdoors.




Pruning the Tree:  A fair amount of Pruning is best handled in April, this is when you can prune back the young spring shoots or "candles" as needed. Candles are covered in brown or whitish bud scales and point upward at first, then later turn green and spread outward. The candle(s) should be pruned back about 2/3 before the candles open. Use your index finger and thumb to pinch them off. If the plant grows thick crowns, you will want to remove at least one bud. Typically there are around three buds per growth, and you will only remove one per growth of the three. You can leave the buds alone, if you want a thicker plant.

In October, it will be time to prune the branches. This is not about cutting the needles, rather cut 1/3 of the branch. You may need to pinch the buds back for a few weeks to balance the needles.

How to water:  The Japanese White Pines require less water than many common plants; therefore sparingly water your plants as needed.

How to spray:  During the summer, you will want to spray the undergrowth, or foliage.

Fertilizing Your Pine:  Fertilizer is used to feed nutrients to your bonsai. The Japanese White Pines require feeding during the spring months and fall. Use slow-processing, natural fertilizer to feed your plant. At the end of fall, amplify the amount of fertilizer and add a moderate amount of chemical radicals, or nitrate. If the tree is sick, or recently been re-potted, do not add fertilizer.

Re-Potting:  Wait five years before you re-pot the plants into a larger pot, with a deep bottom.

Ultimately, eperience will be your greatest guide to growing great Japanese White Pines. Start a few pines each year and before you know it you will have a vast minature forest of beautiful Bonsai trees.

About the Author:  Scott Harker is the publisher of several websites including: Sherlock Holmes Pastiches, Grilled To Perfection - Barbecue, Dieting Help | Move More - Eat Less, and In The Garden.


News About Japanese White Pines


The Boston Globe

A West Roxbury garden shows off the beauty of trees
The Boston Globe
Aoi Japanese white pine (Pinus parviflora “Aoi”): A gorgeous mix of blue and green coloring on the needles characterizes this medium-sized pyramidal tree. > North Light dawn redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides “Schirrmann's Nordlicht”): A deciduous ...



Hamilton Spectator

ROB HOWARD: From perennial showcase to restrained refuge
Hamilton Spectator
Those older trees, along with a Japanese white pine close to their patio, frame the views of the garden. Shrubs and smaller trees include a Daphne that's about to burst into fragrant bloom, a Canadian hemlock notable for a contorted shape, a dwarf ...



Atlantic Highlands Herald

County Marks Arbor Day with Tree Plantings
Atlantic Highlands Herald
At each school, the freeholders presented Arbor Day proclamations and recognized the work of the County's Shade Tree Commission. At each tree planting, the freeholders and Shade Tree staff handed out Eastern white pines, Pinus strobus, to each child.

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The Island Now

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... tour wandering along the trail and looking at all the different trees including sugar maples, large-leaved Linden's, red maples, junipers, Oriental spruce, Easter hemlock, Flowering quince, Eastern white pine, flowering dogwood, magnolias, and ...



Wisconsin Gazette

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While beds tumbling with flowers are lovely, there's an emerging trend in landscape design: the flowerless garden. Varieties of leafy shrubs, trees, vines and grasses create a verdant vista, even in small gardens. “The key to a garden where flowers ...



The Register-Guard

Fifty shades of garden green | Weekend | Eugene, Oregon
The Register-Guard
Flowerless beds display a stunning variety of color.

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Patch.com

Scarsdale Woman's Club Hosts Arbor Day Celebration
Patch.com
Most visitors can't help but notice the magnificent five-hundred- year-old white oak on the front lawn, which is designated as Scarsdale Village's first Heritage Tree. Other mature species include cherry, horse chestnut, linden, red maple, white pine ...



27east.com

Why We Love Delft
27east.com
Every 10 years in the shelter magazine world there seems to be an unabashed groundswell of enthusiasm over blue-and-white china and Delft tile. As if it is a radical new discovery, the design media prattle on about export porcelain's cheery shot of ...



Glens Falls Post-Star

Hometown: April 30
Glens Falls Post-Star
In addition, Kathy Vanselow, a certified herbicide inoculator who will be working to reduce the spread and eradicate the problem of Japanese Knotweed in Warrensburg, will be describing the environmentally safe treatment process that she will be employing.



New York Post

Driver arrested for shooting at van after fender bender | New York Post
New York Post
A BMW driver grabbed his gun and shot at a van that accidentally backed into his vehicle Friday afternoon in downtown Manhattan, police sources said.

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Google News

Planting a Bonsai Tree

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